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Impaired driving is one of America’s most-often-committed and deadliest crimes. Overall in 2009, almost 11,000 people were killed in highway crashes involving a driver or motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher.

Obviously, the paramount consideration in chooosing a motorcycle helmet is how it performs in crash tests. If you’re going to be cruising on the highways without any sort of bodily protection, you need to go to great lengths to protect your head and brain.

Just like airbags and seatbelts in cars, motorcycle helmets are designed to reduce the risk of serious injury in a motorcycle crash. As much as we’d like them to, they cannot prevent injury altogether.

A motorcycle helmet doesn’t do you much good if it comes off in a crash or fails to absorb the impact and protect your brain. The United States Department of Transportation has created a set of standards designed to set the safe helmets apart from the unsafe. Among those standards, the DOT asks whether hte helmet absorbs a significant amoutn of the impact, whether its shell prevents penetration, and whether the fastening system that holds it on your head stays intact when struck with a significant amount of force.

One of the surest ways to cause a brain injury in a motorcycle crash is to wear the wrong helmet or no helmet at all. Virginia motorcycle regulations require that everyone on a bike be wearing a helmet. In addition, the driver either be wearing a helmet that provides some sort of eye protection or must have a face shield on the front of his bike.

After increasing for 11 years straight, motorcyclist fatalities have dropped for the first time in 2009. While motorcyclists make up only 6 percent of motor vehicles on America’s roads, motorcyclist fatalities made up 13 percent of the total traffic fatalities in 2009.

If you’ve been hurt in a motorcycle crash in Virginia, you’re probably beginning to see the medical bills come in and the medical costs piling up. Small injuries are rare in motorcycle crashes because of the lack of protection that motorcycle riders have. You’re probably starting to wonder “who is going to pay all of these bills?” If your first thought is that the insurance company for the negligent driver should be paying them as they come in, you’re in for a surprise.

If you’ve been hurt in a motorcycle crash in Virginia, you’re probably beginning to see the medical bills come in and the medical costs piling up. Small injuries are rare in motorcycle crashes because of the lack of protection that motorcycle riders have. You’re probably starting to wonder “who is going to pay all of these bills?”

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